BAD ART COLLECTIVE

SHOWCASE
 
 
 
 
 
 

DESCRIPTION

The Bad Art Collective is this rad group of people who like bad, unpolished art. We tried to meet every week to experiment and create in the name of bad art. This proved to be difficult for me as I was working two jobs while trying to complete school at the time. However, these weeks of planning and creating culminated into the Bad Art Showcase. For the showcase I contributed the above image in the form of a two-step lenticular print, my animated short MEME and an article in the Bad Art Zine about the underground Japanese art movement known as "Heta-Uma" which almost literally translates to "Bad but Good".


If you'd like to know more about the Bad Art Collective I encourage you to follow this link which leads to the portfolio of one its founding members. She does a much better job of explaining mission and underlying philosophy.

HETA-UMA ARTICLE 

I'd really like to keep this article brief and save space for actual image examples. Heta-Uma is a counter-cultural art movement adopted by several artists in the 1970s. Teruhiko Yumura also known as “King Terry” is known as one of the primary artists spearheading said movement. Heta-Uma roughly translates to “bad but good” and in essence reflects the frustrations of Japanese artists held toward the overly polished commercialism as result of the country's rapidly expanding economy following its newly formed relationship with America. The movement sough to create images which were crude, unflattering or indecent. Garo Magazine, an underground, alternative anthology magazine and a major vehicle for artists of this movement has become majorly influential even outside of Japan. Moreover, many of its associated artists that would later go on to find major success, artist Nekojiru being the most notable. The publication even saw many imitators at the height of its popularity one of which was founded by legendary manga artist Osamu Tezuka. The interesting thing about heta-uma has become so ubiquitous that we don't even recognize when its aesthetic conventions are being borrowed.